Translation of image above: “The world’s most uncomfortable bra”

 

Menghaváné Galáthach

                                                                            

Modern Gaulish Lessons

 

Menghavan 0: Swausé In Tengu

 

Lesson 0: The Sounds Of The Language

 

In this preliminary lesson you will learn what the sounds of the language are.

 

  1. Vowels

 

Modern Gaulish has five vowels. They can be short or long. These are the short ones. The table shows how they are written, what their phonetic value is, and what they sound like using examples in English and other languages.

 

vowel phonetic value (IPA) sound examples
 

a

o

u

e

i

 

 

[a]

[o]

[u]

[e]

[i]

 

 

pat

pot

put

pet

pit

 

 

This table shows the long vowels. They are indicated with diacritics over the vowel, e.g. á is long a.

 

vowel phonetic value (IPA) sound examples
 

á

ó

ú

é

í

 

 

[a:]

[o:]

[u:]

[e:]

[i:]

 

 

part

pole

pool

pay without the final y

peel

 

 

Modern Gaulish has five diphthongs. A diphthong is a group of two vowels written and pronounced together. This table shows them.

 

diphthong phonetic value (IPA) sound examples
 

ái

ói

úi

éi

au

 

 

[a:j]

[o:j]

[u:j]

[e:j]

[au]

 

 

bye

boy

brouillard (French)

bay

cow

 

 

  1. Consonants

 

Modern Gaulish has a large number of consonants. The table below shows how they are written, gives their phonetic description, and gives sound examples in English and other languages. It is not possible to provide examples for every sound.

 

consonant phonetic value (IPA) sound examples
 

p

t

c

b

d

g

v

dh

gh

f

th

ch

fh

m

w

s

sh

n

r

l

nh

rh

lh

ng

 

 

[p]

[t]

[k]

[b]

[d]

[g]

[v]

[ð]

[ɣ]

[f]

[θ]

[x]

[ɸ]

[m]

[w]

[s]

[ʃ]

[n]

[r]

[l]

[xn]

[xr]

[xl]

[ŋ]

 

 

pit

tit

kit

boar

door

gore

very

there

* έγώ, ego, modern Greek “I”

fin

thin

* loch, Scottish; ich, German

* f with no tongue on teeth

may

way

sit

shit

nose

rose

lose

* [x] followed by [n]

* [x] followed by [r]

* [x] followed by [l]

sing

 

 

  1. Vowel length variation

 

The length of a vowel can change. In a word of two syllables or more the emphasis will be on the second last syllable. Often this will make the vowel of that syllable long. Examples are given below.

 

men: to think > vowel /e/ is short

ménu: thought > emphasis on first vowel /e/ which becomes long

menúé: thoughts > emphasis shifts to second last vowel /u/ which becomes long

 

 

 

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